Euphorbia neorubella


Succulentopedia

Euphorbia neorubella (Red Monadenium)

Euphorbia neorubella (Red Monadenium), formerly known as Monadenium rubellum, is a caudiciform plant with a large, rounded tuber or…


Euphorbia neorubella Bruyns

Includes data from the synonyms:

According to Flora of Tropical East Africa under the synonym Monadenium rubellum

Euphorbiaceae, A. R.-Smith. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1987

Morphology General Habit Glabrous perennial herb, with a fleshy rootstock forming clusters of rounded tubers 1.5–3 cm. thick stems fleshy, 1–3 from each tuber, rarely branching, erect to ± 5 cm. or decumbent to ± 25 cm. long (more in cultivation), 4–5 mm. thick, longitudinally ridged and striped with purplish green. Morphology Leaves Leaves sessile, lanceolate, to 4.5 × 1 cm., apex acute, margin entire, lamina flushed with purple stipules scale-like, acutely 1–4-toothed, ± 0.5 mm. across, brown. Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences Cymes on peduncles to 1.7 cm. long, 1-forked bract-cup exceeding the involucre, ± 6 × 4 mm., notched for 1/3 between acute apices and prominent midribs, rose-pink. Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences Cyathia Cyathia ± 4.5 × 4 mm., with barrel-shaped involucres glandular rim 1.5 mm. high, red lobes rounded, ± 1 × 1.3 mm. sex Male Male flowers:bracteoles few, laciniate, puberulous stamens 2.6 mm. long. Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Female flower:styles 1 mm. long, joined to halfway, with thickened rugulose bifid apices. Male flowers:bracteoles few, laciniate, puberulous stamens 2.6 mm. long. sex Female Female flower:styles 1 mm. long, joined to halfway, with thickened rugulose bifid apices. Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits Capsule exserted on a pedicel 5 mm. long, acutely 3-lobed with truncate base, ± 4.5 × 4 mm. Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds Seeds oblong, with truncate base, 2.5 × 1.3 mm., pale brown, surface roughened caruncle stipitate, 1 mm. in diameter. Habitat Amongst rocks, with Xerophyta 1520 m. Distribution known only from the type locality K4


Name Status Confi­dence level Source Date supplied
Monadenium montanum var. rubellum P.R.O.Bally Synonym WCSP 2012-03-23
Monadenium rubellum (P.R.O.Bally) S.Carter Synonym WCSP 2012-03-23

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Growing Euphorbia

Why Grow Euphorbia?

  • Deer resistant
  • Drought and heat tolerant
  • Long blooming
  • Low maintenance

Euphorbia Care:

Some are short-lived (even so, totally worth growing) and should be divided or propagated every two to three years, either in early fall or spring.

Many benefit from being cut back hard, at least by one-third, after flowering is finished. This keeps any free-seeders from gaining the upper hand and encourages a flush of new fresh foliage.

  • Trim back any damaged stems in early spring to keep the plant tidy and heathy
  • Cut back euphorbia stems at the base immediately after bloom
  • Clip carefully, new shoots will likely be emerging that you want to keep in tact

Wear gloves when handling euphorbias, and quickly wash off any milky sap that gets on your skin, as it’s a strong irritant. The sap also makes spurges poisonous, so be aware if you have children and pets, though I’ve had euphorbias and garden cats coexist for years without incident — perhaps the plants’ skunky smell keeps them from seeming like a tasty treat.

Zones:

Perennial euphorbias vary in hardiness, particularly as concerns their northern edges, so check individual entries for the plants covered here. Some types are evergreen in southerly zones but are only root hardy farther north. Other types are best grown as annuals.

Exposure: Sun or Shade?

Euphorbias in general are sun lovers, though some will tolerate partial shade. Those with deep-purple or reddish foliage will have more-intense coloring if planted in full sun. A very few types actually prefer at least dappled shade, while others can thrive in bright sun in the North but need part shade in the blinding light of the South. Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae is a popular choice that grows well in shade.

One of the main benefits of growing spurges is their drought tolerance, so good drainage is key, though a few, such as E. griffithii ‘Dixter’ and E. dulcis ‘Chameleon’, do prefer more moisture than others. Euphorbias are also not picky about soils, and most can handle sandy and average situations. For those types that tend to run and spread, fertile soils could encourage them to expand beyond their boundaries, so keeping things lean lends control. But if you want your E. amygdaloides var. robbiae to cover more ground faster, rich organic soil will kick things off.


Name Status Confi­dence level Source
Monadenium montanum var. rubellum P.R.O.Bally Synonym WCSP
Monadenium rubellum (P.R.O.Bally) S.Carter Synonym WCSP

The following databases may contain further information on this name. Please click on any button to follow a link to that database.

To return to The Plant List : please use your browser's back button to return to this page.


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